Morni Wildlife (Herpetofauna): Striped-burrowing frog

November 13, 2014

Striped-burrowing frog/Greenstripe frog (Cyclorana/Litoria alboguttata)- is a frog of the woodlands and grassy patches generally seen in temporary pools and around ditches. It has a distinctive yellow-green glossy stripe that runs down the middle of the back. Equally prominent is a dark streak from the snout through the eye, ear disc, over shoulder to beyond forearm. The green stripe has distinctive longitudinal skin folds from shoulder to groin. The frog is about 3″ in size – females are larger than males. The frog is olive-brown above and white below. The fingers are unwebbed, toes about half-webbed. The skin of the back has scattered warts and ridges.

The frog is called a burrowing frog because during summers it retreats underground by burrowing and retaining a bladderful of dilute urine that serves as a water reserve (also called a water-holding frog). It becomes inert inside the burrow and develops an impermeable cacoon of partially shed skin to prevent water loss. They emerge after the summer rains.Its rapid ‘quacking’ call can be heard from the ground or from under water.

Striped-burrowing frog- Greenstripe, Berwala choe, Morni Hills (August)

Striped-burrowing frog- Greenstripe, Berwala choe, Morni Hills (August)

Striped-burrowing frog, Berwala choe, Morni Hills (August)

Striped-burrowing frog- Greenstripe, Berwala choe, Morni Hills (August)- the distinctive stripe

Filed in: Wildlife

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An environmental enthusiast who loves tramping through the hills in search of the picturesque.

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