Morni Bhojs & Panchayats

October 7, 2011

 

Sr. No.

BHOJ

2001 Census

Village Panchayat Code

Village Panchayat Name

1.

RAJPURA

2347

27567

BALDAWALA

2.

27578

RAJPURA

3.

DHARTI

1112

27569

DHARTI

4.

JABYAL

1220

27570

JABYAL

5.

KOTI

1364

27571

KOTI-DARDA

6.

KOTHI

480

27572

KOTHI

7.

KUDANA

1167

27573

KUDANA

8.

BALAG

491

27568

BALAG

9.

NAITA

531

27575

NAITA

10.

PONTA

1154

27577

PONTA

11.

TIPRA

871

27579

TIPRA

12.

PALASRA

1722

241007

PALASARA

13.

MATOUR

3060

27574

MATOUR

14.

27584

SABILPUR

15.

27585

THAPLI

16.

27582

DUDHGARH

17.

NAGGAL

2959

27580

DABSU

18.

27581

THANDOG

19.

27583

RAJI TIKRI

20.

27586

UTTARON

DARARA

253

During the British times, the 14 bhojes of Morni formed the ‘Jagir’ of the Mir of Kotaha. The Mir had to pay the British government revenue for his jagir as assessed from time to time. The Mir in turn entrusted the work of revenue collection to ‘karkuns’ who were the lambardars in Morni ilaqa for the purpose of the Land Revenue Act. The Mir had appointed 16 karkuns for the entire jagir, 1 for each bhoj barring Bhoj Naggal and Bhoj Matour, each of which had 2 karkuns. 14 bhojes were in turn divided into 172 hamlets, each with a headman. The headmen did the actual work of revenue collection and the proceeds were handed over to the karkun, less 2% which was deducted by the headman (a concession/incentive that was allowed by the Mir). The karkuns in turn deposited the revenue in the tehsil after deducting their share of 5% of the revenue collected by them (pachotra cess) .

The “Bhoj” System seems to have been borrowed from the Sirmur State that had overlordship over the Morni Ilaqa for long periods of time. Sirmur was divided into 4 tehsils and 12 waziris. Each waziri was divided into bhojes – the 12 waziris being divided into 119 bhojes. An official called ‘Guldar’, a corruption of ‘ghaladar’ (literally a store-keeper of grain) was in charge of each waziri. He was also called ‘jamandar ‘and had a ‘barati’ or ‘chaprasi’ under him. These officials often lived in the capital and visited their charges to perform their function. Each Bhoj had a ‘siana’ or headman and over each group of two or more bhojes there was a ‘chontru’ or ‘zaildar’. A ‘siana’ had a ‘dhimedar’ as his deputy. Each Bhoj comprised a number of hamlets which had a common meeting place for amusements and social or religious gatherings, subscriptions being raised throughout the Bhoj in cash and kind for common objects. The Bhoj system got disturbed with the Land Revenue Settlement of  1890 when separate Lambardaris were established for smaller village units – each comprising a large group of houses with a temple of its own, a common thrashing floor (khalian), a common shed for storing grain (kharoli) and a common stove (bhat) for frying grain for sattu.

References:

1. Gazetteer of the Sirmur State 1934

Filed in: Villages

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An environmental enthusiast who loves tramping through the hills in search of the picturesque.

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