Archive for February, 2013

Shrubs of Morni: Great Globe Thistle

February 26, 20130 Comments

Great White Globe Thistle/ Pale Globe Thistle (Echinops sphaerocephalus) is easily identified by the near perfect flower spheres (2″in diametre) that stand tall atop erect stems. Flowering takes place from June to September. The petals that make up the flower spheres are white/pale-blue.  Flowers are pollinated by honey-bees,wasps and butterflies. Leaves are gray-green, sharply toothed and […]

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Bhadrakali Temple at Bani

February 26, 20130 Comments

Bani is the site of an ancient village on the Morni-Badiyal road, some 16 KM from Morni. The road to Bani crosses the Sherla tal turning left at the tri-junction with the road to Samlotha and thereafter descends steadily to cross Badiyal and Thana villages to reach Bani, just short of the seasonal nadi (a […]

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Shrubs of Morni: Rose Bud Jasmine

February 25, 20130 Comments

Rose Bud Jasmine (Jasmine dichotomum)    

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Birds of Morni: White-browed Fantail Flycatcher

February 25, 20130 Comments

White-browed Fantail Flycatcher (Rhipidura aureola)  about 7″ with dark, dull, blackish-brown body and the trademark white ‘eyebrows’ (superciliums) and a fan-shaped tail.The throat is black with a white collar. The fan-shaped tail feathers have white edges. The beak and the feet are black. It is a restless bird that continously flicks its tail up and […]

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Shrubs of Morni: Kans grass

February 13, 20133 Comments

Kans grass/ Kash phool (Saccharum spontaneum) is a deep-rooted, coarse and erect  perennial grass of South Asia that colonizes the monsoon flood plains of the Terai-Bhabar belt (in the foothills of the Shivalik hills) after the rains and forms thick pure stands in the area. It grows to a height of about 3 metres and blooms […]

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Trees of Morni: Chaste tree

February 12, 20130 Comments

Chaste tree/ Nirgundi/ Sindvar/ Negundo (Vitex negundo) – a small tree (size of a large shrub) with a single woody trunk that grows in wastelands and the Himalayas upto a height of 2000 metres. Leaves are pointed with 3 to 5 leaflets and have a pungent odour. Fresh leaves are burnt as a fumigant to get rid […]

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Shrubs of Morni: Blue Billygoat Weed

February 11, 20130 Comments

Blue Billygoat Weed/Goat weed/ flossflower/ bluemink/ blueweed/ bluetop (Ageratum houstonianum) A short-lived, perennial plant that emerges and flowers all year round. The tiny, ray flowers are pale lavender blue and occur as showy, fluffy clusters on ends of erect stems. The seeds are black and attached to whitish fluff that assists in wind dispersal. Leaves are mid-green, […]

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Shrubs of Morni: Scarlet Gourd

February 10, 20130 Comments

Ivy Gourd/ Scarlet Gourd/ Tum Lung/ Pak Tum Luk/ Kundru in Hindi (Coccinia grandis/indica) a fast growing tropical vine that bears green, pickle-sized fruit that turns scarlet on ripening. The tendrils are about 6″ in length and are spring-like and coiled. Leaves are 5-pointed, palm-shaped. Flowers are white and star shaped. Fruiting takes place from […]

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Shrubs of Morni: Lantana camara

February 8, 20131 Comment

Lantana camara/ Spanish Flag is a hardy, tropical bush with red-yellow (the colours of the flag of Spain) flowers. It is native to tropical America and was introduced as an ornamental garden hedge in India and other parts of the world. Lantana camara is today considered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) […]

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Shrubs of Morni: Yellow-berried Nightshade

February 8, 20130 Comments

Yellow-berried Nightshade/ Thorny Nightshade (Solanum virginianum/ xanthocarpum) is a woody, creepy shrub with sturdy, needlelike thorns and prickly leaves. The thorns cover the stem and the leaves have thorns along the midrib and other nerves. Flowers are blue-purple with yellow anthers and berries are yellow. Flowers arrive in early summer. Medicinal preparations are used to treat […]

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