Archive for May, 2012

Trees of Morni: Karva Indrajau

May 30, 20120 Comments

Karva Indrajau/ Dudhi/ Kutaj/ Kewar/ Kurchi (Holarrhena pubescens) a small deciduous tree that grows upto 10 feet and is common in the sub-Himalayan tract. The stem is short with numerous branches. The flowers are fragrant, white with five petals that turn creamy yellow. The flowers occur in clusters. The leaves are ovate, about 6″ long […]

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Trees of Morni: Amaltas

May 29, 20120 Comments

Amaltas/ Golden Shower Tree (Cassia fistula) – a beautiful tropical tree that sheds its leaves in summers and bursts into bunches of yellow-golden, fragrant flowers that hang like grapes. The tree grows well in well-drained soil and tolerates dry conditions.  A fast growing tree that can grow upto 60 feet in height. The wood is hard […]

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Trees of Morni: Sohanjna

May 29, 20120 Comments

Sohanjna/ Horseradish Tree/ Drumstick Tree (Moringa Oleifera) a fast growing, small deciduous tree with deep roots that help it survive dry conditions. It prefers well-drained clays. The bark is smooth dark grey. The wood is soft and light and of limited use. It produces flowers all year round if water is ample. The foliage is […]

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Trees of Morni: Biul

May 29, 20120 Comments

Biul (Grewia oppositifolia) a moderate sized deciduous tree found scattered in hill ranges of northern India upto an altitude of 7000 feet.   The bark is whitish and the wood is elastic and tough. The bark yields a jute like fibre. The wood releases an unpleasant odour when first cut and is hence rarely used […]

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Morni Wildlife (Insects): Giant Honey Bee

May 17, 20120 Comments

Apis dorsata is a giant honey bee found in the forested areas of South/ South-east Asia and is about 2 cm in length. Nest consists of a single wax comb suspended  from a high tree branch in an exposed place. The comb is covered by a dense mass of bees in several layers. When disturbed […]

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Morni Wildlife (Insects): Paper Wasp

May 17, 20120 Comments

The Tramp has encountered on his treks the ball-like nests of paper wasps that hang menacingly from the high-branches of tall-trees in the Morni forests. While identification is not certain but it seems likely that the paper wasps of Morni are ‘Polistes’. The genus ‘polistes’ are the most common type of ‘paper wasps‘ a type of […]

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Morni Wildlife (Arachnids): Giant Crab Spider

May 16, 20120 Comments

Giant Crab Spider/ Golden Huntsman (Olios giganteus) a large light brown spider with a leg span of over 2 inches (females are larger). It gets its name ‘crab’ from its ability to move sideways. It can climb smooth vertical surfaces with ease. A tropical species, it is found in a variety of habitats- under rocks, […]

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Trees of Morni: Punjab Fig

May 15, 20120 Comments

Punjab Fig/ Jangli-Anjir/ Khemri (Ficus palmata) is a moderate sized deciduous tree with a smooth dull ash gray/ whitish bark. Wood is light coloured, of moderate strength. Leaves are dark green and heart-shaped with toothed margins. The fruit, ‘Punjab Fig’ is a small sized fruit with a pleasant taste.  The fig dries up and turns […]

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Trees of Morni: Crocodile-bark Tree

May 15, 20120 Comments

Crocodile-bark tree/ Sein/ Asan/ Asana/ Saaj (Terminalia elliptica or tomentosa/Pentaptera tomentosa) is a tall deciduous tree with a tough fire-resistant bark that resembles the crocodile skin! The bark is known to have medicinal values. Sein is found at altitudes upto 1000 metres in both dry and moist deciduous forests. The tree stores water in the trunk […]

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Trees of Morni: Aamla

May 10, 20120 Comments

Aamla/ Indian Gooseberry (Phyllanthus emblica) a small to medium sized deciduous tree with globular yellow-green berries known for the high nutritional and medicinal value. The berries ripen in autumn and fruit is borne by the upper branches. Aamla fruit, bark etc is used extensively in Ayurvedic formulations for treating inflammations, cough, gastric problems and to stimulate hair […]

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